Man Crashes Car as He Live Streams Joy Ride on Facebook Fighting For His Life

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A Rhode Island man who streamed his 114 mile per hour joy ride live on Facebook crashed his car into a truck and hit a concrete barrier.

Onasi Olio-Rojas, 20, of Pawtucket, lost control of his vehicle after he weaved through traffic on Route 6 in Providence and hit a garbage truck entering the highway.

He proceeded to crash into a concrete barrier after the impact sent him traveling across three lanes. He is currently in critical condition.

Rescue workers had to extract him from his totaled Honda vehicle and take him to Rhode Island Hospital, where he is still fighting for his life.

The video, which does not show the crash itself, shows Olio-Rojas blasting music on his extra large car speakers, as he sang along and pointed the camera to his odometer, which displayed his reaching speeds up to 114 mph.

The video was confirmed as authentic by police, reports WJAR-TV.

Police might seek charges in the accident, as the driver was using his mobile phone whilst driving, which is illegal in most U.S. states.

Rhode Island law dictates that texting when driving is illegal, and anyone under the age of 18 is not allowed to use any mobile device, even if it is hands-free, whilst driving.

In addition, there are reports circulating stating that Olio-Rojas’ license was suspended at the time of the incident.

The driver of the truck was not harmed, but the accident left traffic congested for up to two hours after the crash.

Distracted driving is becoming a progressively worsening issue globally, as video streaming becomes popular and accessible for most.

In regards to the matter, the Governor’s Highway Safety Association writes:

“The federal government should fund considerably more research to determine the scope and nature of the distracted driving problem.”

“Further, the federal government should fund a comprehensive media campaign to educate the public about the dangers of distracted driving and the way to manage driver distractions. GHSA opposes federal legislation that would penalize states for not restricting the use of cell phones or other electronic devices.”